White Shrimp

White Shrimp
Common Name White Shrimp
Scientific name (Lito) Penaeus setiferous

Sourcing Summary

Size

4-8 in.

U.S. white shrimp are caught from August to November, and are usually available frozen as tail meat year-round. White shrimp is low in saturated fat and is a very good source of selenium and vitamin B12. Random tests are recommended to ensure that the shrimp that arrives is actually what was ordered.

Buyer Beware: Most shrimp is treated with the preservative sodium tripolyphosphate, but too much will make the shrimp appear translucent and give them a soapy feel. Buyers recommend asking for specific moisture content since processors sometimes undercook the shrimp to increase weight. Many fishermen prevent black spots on shells by using bisodium sulfates but overuse causes pitting on the shells.

Product Forms

Fresh/Frozen
Fresh
Product Forms
Head-on
Tails (shell on)
Fresh/Frozen
Frozen
Product Forms
Head-on
Tails (butterflied)
Tails (EZ-Peel)
Tails (P&D)
Tails (PUD)
Tails (raw)
Tails (shell on)

Fresh Seasonal Availability

JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec
nonononoyesyesyesyesyesyesyesyes

Culinary Composition

Sweet

Flavor

Medium

Texture

Cooking Methods

Health/Nutrition

Nutrition facts

Serving Size: 100g
Amount per serving
Calories 106
Total Fat 1.73g
Cholesterol 152mg
Sodium - Sodium 148mg
Carbohydrates 0g
Protein 20.3

Science & Management

Wild
Fishing Methods

Conservation Criteria - Wild

Impact on Stock

White shrimp are highly fecund and can grow fairly quickly, allowing them to rebound quickly from unfavorable environmental conditions such as extreme cold weather. The population levels of white shrimp, which are particularly abundant in the Gulf of Mexico, are high and overfishing is not occurring, according to the National Marine Fisheries Service. They thrive in marshy, estuary-filled areas and are found higher in the water column than brown and pink shrimp.

Habitat impacts ( Wild)

Although fishermen use a variety of gear to catch white shrimp, the otter trawl is the most common. Since this gear is meant to maximize contact with the ocean bottom, it can harm marine organisms, damage the seafloor, disturb sediment, lower sea grass production, and cause an increase in algal blooms. Trawling also occurs in the same areas annually. Overall, the effects of trawling on the habitat are a moderate concern in this fishery.

Bycatch

Thousands of sea turtles are caught in shrimp trawls annually in the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico. Since shrimping trawlers interact with sea turtles so much, U.S. shrimpers are required to have turtle extruder devices (TEDs). Compliance varies but is good in the southeast Atlantic coast shrimp fishery, according to the Environmental Defense Fund. The white shrimp fishery also contributes to mortality in Gulf of Mexico red snapper, which has been overfished for decades. Other species of concern include endangered smalltooth sawfish, endangered Atlantic sturgeon and overfished blacknosed shark.

Management effectiveness

Commercial shrimp fisheries are working on reducing bycatch impact through time-area closures and bycatch reduction devices, according to the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service. The white shrimp fishery abundance is monitored by the NMFS. Despite management efforts in the shrimp fisheries, bycatch continues to greatly outweigh shrimp landings. Bycatch reduction methods depend on compliance, which is not at 100%.

Conservation Criteria - Farmed

Origin Method Ratings
Mexico - Gulf of Mexico Artisanal Bottom Trawl  
Mexico - Gulf of Mexico Artisanal Entanglement Net  
Mexico - Gulf of Mexico Artisinal Suripera Net  
Mexico - Gulf of Mexico Bottom Trawl  
Mexico - Pacific Artisanal Bottom Trawl  
Mexico - Pacific Artisanal Entanglement Net  
Mexico - Pacific Artisinal Suripera Net  
Mexico - Pacific Bottom Trawl  
USA - Gulf of Mexico Bottom Trawl    
USA - Gulf of Mexico Skimmer Trawl    
USA - Louisiana Bottom Trawl    
USA - South Atlantic Bottom Trawl    
All Other Origins All Other Fishing Methods    
Name Country State / Province
Anna Marie Seafood United States Louisiana
Baton Rouge Shrimp Company, Inc. United States Louisiana
Bon Secour Fisheries, Inc. United States Alabama
Cape Canaveral Shrimp Co. United States Florida
Carson & Company Inc United States Alabama
Cherry Point Seafoods United States South Carolina
Core Sound Seafood United States North Carolina
Crimson Bay Seafood United States Alabama
Dubberly's Seafood United States Georgia
Georgia Shrimp Association United States Georgia
International Oceanic Enterprises, Inc. United States Alabama
Katie's Seafood Market United States Texas
Livingston's Bulls Bay Seafood United States South Carolina
Lowcountry Catch United States South Carolina
Mama's Pickled Shrimp United States South Carolina
McRoberts Sales Co., Inc. United States Florida
Ocean Beauty Seafoods LLC United States Washington
Palomino Foods, Inc. United States Washington
Pier Seafood United States Texas
Royal Hawaiian Seafood United States California
Safe Harbor Seafood Market United States Florida
Sea to Table, USA United States New York
Triar Seafood Company United States Florida
Water Street Seafood, Inc United States Florida
Western Seafood Co., Inc. United States Texas
Wood's Fisheries, Inc. United States Florida